The shoulder joint is responsible for the most of the upper limbs’ range of motion. It consists of the following joints: the glenohumeral, acromioclavicular, scapulocostal and the sternoclavicular joint, together with subacromial space. Each of these structures can cause pain in the shoulder and cause significant limitation of the motion of the limb.

The most common symptoms of shoulder joint disorders are:

  • pain, often occurring also while resting,
  • a high degree of restriction of mobility,
  • and pain radiating to the neck and upper extremities.

 

 

In order to determine the type of disorder and to select appropriate treatment a very careful examination with several orthopaedic tests is performed, allowing to determine which element of the shoulder joint is affected. In addition, radiographs, MRI and dynamic ultrasound tests are used, as they allow the assessment of the muscles during their movement. In order to make a correct diagnosis, a thorough orthopaedic examination is of utmost importance – other tests are only there to help in the diagnostic process.

In cases where surgery is required, we use a wide range of arthroscopic procedures allowing for accurate assessment of the damaged tissues, an anatomical repair of the damage or radical removal of pathologies, without any unnecessary damage to surrounding tissues. We use a modern pneumatic lift during all our arthroscopic procedures. It allows performing a full range of motion of the operated limb and, therefore, keep it in any position. This method of treatment increases the comfort of the surgery and allows for an easy access to the treaded area.

  • congenital instability of the shoulder joint
  • the subacromial impingement syndrome
  • obliterative bursitis
  • damage to the rotator cuff
  • damage to the origin of the long head tendon of the long head and the acetabulum; the so-called SLAP tear
  • instability of the long head tendon in the humeral socket
  • loose bodies
  • traumatic dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint
  • traumatic fracture of the greater tuberosity
  • degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint
  • congenital instability of the shoulder joint
  • the subacromial impingement syndrome
  • obliterative bursitis
  • damage to the rotator cuff
  • damage to the origin of the long head tendon of the long head and the acetabulum; the so-called SLAP tear
  • instability of the long head tendon in the humeral socket
  • loose bodies
  • traumatic dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint
  • traumatic fracture of the greater tuberosity
  • degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint